Meytal Nasie

Meytal Nasie is a PhD student in the field of Education at Tel Aviv University. Her research focuses on inter-group conflict resolutions in a broader context of inter-group relations. Using the Israeli- Palestinian conflict as a primary case study, Meytal explores the impact of respect and disrespect on conflict escalation, moderation, and reconciliation. Within this context, her empirical research, which is conducted among Israelis and Palestinians, enables the simultaneous examination of the perspectives of both sides of the conflict. Meytal's study emphasizes the importance of education for respect for the other in relationships in general and in conflicts in particular. 

Journals:

Nasie, M., & Bar-Tal, D. "Sociopsychological infrastructure of an intractable conflict through the eyes of Palestinian children and adolescents". Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 18 no. 1 (2012): 3-20.

Nasie, M., & Bar-Tal, D. "Reflection of sociopsychological infrastructure of an intractable conflict in Palestinian children and youth's newspapers (1996-2007)". Megamot, 48 no. 2 (2012): 309-336 (In Hebrew).

•Nasie, M., Bar-Tal, D., Pliskin, R., Nahhas, E., & Halperin, E. (in press). Overcoming the barrier of narrative adherence in conflicts through awareness of the psychological bias of naïve realism. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

• Nasie, M., Bar-Tal, D., & Shnaidman, O. (2014). Activists in Israeli radical peace organizations: Their personal stories about joining and taking part in these organizations. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 20 (3), 313-329.




Presentations at Conferences:

Nasie, M., Bar-Tal, D., & Shnaidman, O. (2012, June; 2013, July). Activists in Israeli radical peace organizations: Why do they join these organizations? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Israel Studies (AIS), Haifa, Israel; and at the annual meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology (ISPP), Herzliya, Israel.  

Nasie, M., & Bar-Tal, D. "Sociopsychological infrastructure of intractable conflict through the lens of Palestinians: Analysis of children & youth's writings in the Palestinian newspapers (1996-2007)" (Poster presented at EASP - The European Association of Social Psychology – meeting on "Resolving Societal Conflicts and Building Peace: Socio-Psychological Dynamics". Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Hertzelia, Israel 2009).

• Nasie, M., Halperin, E., Bar-Tal, D., Pliskin, R., & Nahhas, E., (2013, July). Overcoming the barrier of narrative adherence in conflicts through awareness to the psychological bias of naïve realism. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology (ISPP), Herzliya, Israel.

 Diamond, A.*, Nasie, M.*, & Bar-Tal, D. (2014, July). The political socialization of young children in intractable conflicts. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology (ISPP), Rome, Italy. 
*Equal contribution



  




 
Volunteer activity at the Azrieli Institute for Educational Empowerment in Bat-Yam

I very much enjoy my volunteer activity and service at the Azrieli Institute for Educational Empowerment in Bat-Yam. In this activity, I meet once a week with a group of ten wonderful teenagers who are in 7th grade, for the purpose of social tutoring. As an educational counselor and a doctoral student in the field of education, I have chosen activity that is close to my heart and relevant to my skills, so I can contribute as much as I can. My goal is to provide guidance for the teenagers in their first year of junior high school, and enhance their social skills so that they can better cope with life’s challenges. Accordingly, the activity is based on both individual and group levels, which meets the program vision of the Azrieli Institute for Educational Empowerment. We have started the process with a team building journey and continue with a range of activities that focus on internalizing of norms and manners of speech, empathy for others, team work, cooperation, limits, trust, values, coping with challenges, enhancing self-esteem, and character strengths. In addition, there are varying social enrichment activities. For example, in preparation for the annual evening of the Azrieli Educational Empowerment in Bat-Yam, the group worked on making self-portraits, in which they expressed their artistic talents with oil-color paintings on canvas; these paintings then also served as decorations for that evening. In this activity, they showed enjoyment, excitement, cooperation, patience, discipline, and introspection. Overall, I am very satisfied with my work and the group, and feel that I have a good connection with the children and see how they are progressing week after week. Indeed, I enjoy every moment and look forward to my next meeting with them. The social activity complements the learning activity that the children have during the week in the Azrieli Institute for Educational Empowerment, and it is important for their success in the educational empowerment as a whole. I am glad to take part in this educational empowerment process, share my experience, and contribute to the society.