Fellows 2016 - 2017

 

Avishai Abbo

Avishai Abbo

Avishai is a PhD student in Geology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Avishai specializes in tectonics and processes that form continental crust, and in dating single mineral grains (such as zircon and rutile) that constrain the formation time of the crustal rocks, as well as isotopic measurements that show their source and evolution. His research deals with the evolution of continental crust in Israel, Turkey and South-East Europe, and the processes that led to its formation and its history over the past 500 million years. Avishai's work combines both classic field geology – that includes studying the rocks in the field and sampling, together with advanced analytical methods (especially laser based techniques) in an effort to probe the chemistry, age and isotopic signatures of rocks and minerals that can constrain the timing of tectonic events. Avishai hopes to make a significant contribution to the study of continental geodynamics in our region, and to our understanding of these processes on a global scale.   (read more)
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Alon Appleboim

Alon Appleboim

Alon is a graduate student in the computational biology and computer science program at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His Research involves the development and application of high throughput methods in molecular and computational biology in order to characterize cellular regulatory circuits. The main research question Alon is focusing on is how do cells, carrying identical genetic information, express different genes as the result of their exposure to different environments. To this end, Alon develops novel molecular techniques, computational models, and statistical machine learning algorithms to extract insights from high-throughput experiments aimed at cellular decision-making. Alon believes that understanding these regulatory mechanisms will allow us to better diagnose, treat, and even prevent the onset of diseases that are the result of genetic mis-regulation, as in the case of cancer.  (read more)
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Saar Alon Barkat

Saar Alon Barkat

Saar is a Ph.D. student in public administration at the Hebrew University's Political Science Department. His research focuses on government organizations' communications with citizens and their effect on citizens' attitudes towards these organizations. More specifically, Saar's study focuses on the symbolic aspects of these communications, which are prominent in the use of branding and marketing tools (e.g. the use of logos, images, celebrity endorsements and the like). Saar wishes to enhance our understanding of the complex relations between governments and citizens in the present era, and its implications for democracy.  (read more)
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Ella Assaf Shpayer

Ella Assaf Shpayer

Ella is a PhD student in the field of Prehistoric Archaeology at Tel Aviv University. Her research investigates aspects of knowledge transmission and learning processes relating to stone tools production (which were essential for the survival of mankind in ancient societies) and their identification in the archaeological record (starting from half a million years ago). In the prehistoric past, much like today, learning processes were probably very significant in children’s lives. However, we know very little about this issue. Ella's research aims to provide a broader perspective on learning processes among prehistoric human societies and to deepen our understanding regarding the cognitive abilities of our ancestors, hoping to shed light on our understanding of the origins of our modern way of life and modern learning processes.  (read more)
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Rona Aviram

Rona Aviram

Rona is a PhD student in the Weizmann institute of Science, in the Biomolecular Sciences department. In her studies, she tries to elucidate a biological function we all share: timekeeping. Far from being a simplistic watch, mammals have elaborate clock mechanisms that allow us to be our own timekeepers. Constantly ticking from the cellular level to the organism level, our biological clocks serve as a great system to test the size and limits of physiological processes. Advancing our knowledge of these issues is key for improvement of life quality and longevity.    (read more)
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Miriam Babichenko

Miriam Babichenko

Miriam is a PhD student in the School of Education at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her research focuses on teachers' professional discourse in weekly team meetings, assuming that this context may provide them with meaningful opportunities to think, reflect and inquire into their practice. More specifically, Miriam focuses on the way that video-recordings of classroom interaction are employed as resources for such collaborative inquiry. Miriam wishes to characterize interactional norms that may hinder learning in the context of video-discussion; and describes ways in which these challenges may be overcome. Additionally, Miriam develops an assessment tool to reliably capture the main features of productive teacher discourse in school team meetings, a tool that will form the basis for descriptive and comparative research into teachers' professional discourse in scale.   (read more)
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Dr. Tsevi Beatus

Dr. Tsevi Beatus

Dr. Beatus is a new faculty member at the Hebrew University in Bio-Engineering Center, with appointments in the School of Computer Science and Engineering and the Institute of Life Sciences.  Tsevi returned to Israel from a postdoc at the Physics Department of Cornell University. His research lies at the interface between Physics, Engineering, and Biology, and focuses on understanding the mechanisms of flight control in tiny insects, such as fruit flies. Tsevi uses a unique method to “trip” flies in mid-air, with fast cameras that film how the flies recover from these stumbles. He found that flies employ cutting-edge concepts from control theory, such as nonlinear, robust, and hierarchical control, and their control reflex is among the fastest in the animal kingdom. Inspired by the elegant control solutions insects have evolved, Tsevi aims to understand the mechanism of flight control in the framework of control theory. His research is expected to have impact also in neuroscience, fluid mechanics, and the development of insect-like flying robots.
More about Tsevi's work in http://www.beatus-lab.org  (read more)
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Arielle Blonder

Arielle Blonder

Arielle is an architect and a Phd student at the Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion. Her research relates to materiality in architecture, an evolving field of research that investigated material-based systems and processes in architecture and design. The research focuses on “Textile Materiality”, a term coined by Arielle, placing it in architectural context, as an alternative approach to design and fabrication. It examines the potential of integrating methods and techniques that rely on the unique capacities of textile; in the fabrication of architectural elements of composite materials (Fiber reinforced polymers). While the standard fabrication of such elements requires limiting fixed and rigid molds, Arielle wishes to embed features, tools and methods of form making from the textile world (such as folds, cut outs and pleats) in the fabrication of architectural composite elements, as a new design and fabrication approach. The importance of this research lies in its potential for freeing architectural FRP fabrication from the limits of the molds, and expanding the range of processes, methods, forms and design approaches, which are still restricted today in that field.   (read more)
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Dr. Andrea Cassatella

Dr. Andrea Cassatella

Dr. Cassatella completed his PhD studies at the University of Toronto, and is currently pursuing his postdoctoral research in Political Theory at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research focuses on the challenge that the global resurgence of religion poses to Western understandings and political forms. Working at the frontiers between political theory, continental philosophy and postcolonial studies of religion, Dr. Cassatella hopes to illuminate some key unquestioned assumptions and political implications of modern secularism.  (read more)
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Talya Eden

Talya Eden

Talya is a Ph.D. student in the School of Electrical Engineering in Tel Aviv University. Her research focuses on algorithms design, and in particular developing algorithms for efficiently extracting information from big data. As today's data sets has become so large to accurately process (e.g., even simple protein networks may describe interactions between hundreds of thousands of materials), new algorithms are required in order to efficiently manage the information and test its basic properties. Talya is developing ``ultra-efficient'' algorithms, that with high probability, produce highly accurate answers in a very short time. The amounts of recorded information will keep growing at a faster and faster pace, and so these algorithms are becoming of crucial importance.  (read more)
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Michal Eisenberg-Bord

Michal Eisenberg-Bord

Michal is a PhD student in the department of Molecular Genetics at the Weizmann Institute of Science. She is studying the function of mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, which are involved in essential cellular processes, and whose dysfunction is associated with many genetic diseases and is related to neurodegenerative conditions. Using a combination of high-content screening tools, alongside with in-depth biochemical characterization, Michal wishes to uncover ways by which mitochondria communicate with other organelles, and how this communication allows mitochondria to maintain their functions.   (read more)
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Dr. Jerry Alfred Fereiro

Dr. Jerry Alfred Fereiro

Dr. Fereiro completed his doctorate in Chemistry in University of Alberta, Canada and he is currently pursuing a postdoctoral research at the Weizmann Institute of Science in the Department of Materials and Interfaces. His principal research interests lie in the field of molecular electronics. During his PhD at University of Alberta, he investigated the interaction of light with molecular junctions, measuring the photocurrent spectra and understanding the complex phenomenon of charge transfer process. In his current position, he examines dark and light-induced electronic transport mechanisms via proteins, which are remarkably efficient electronic conductors, with a central vision of using proteins as potential building components for future bio-electronic devices.  (read more)
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Dr. Adara Goldberg

Dr. Adara Goldberg

Dr. Goldberg completed her PhD studies in the History Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. She is currently pursuing her postdoctoral research at the Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry at Hebrew University. Utilizing oral documentation sources as well as memoirs, diaries, and social service agency records, her research will create a comparative analysis of child and youth Holocaust survivor resettlement and integration in postwar Commonwealth countries: Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the Union of South Africa. Through a cross-cultural and multi-national lens, her research will widen awareness of the role and influence of countries and cultures of resettlement on child and youth survivors’ postwar lives. Adara’s book, Holocaust Survivors in Canada: Exclusion, Inclusion, Transformation, 1947-1955 (University of Manitoba Press, 2015) won The Marsid Foundation Prize at the 2016 Western Jewish Canada Book Award.
   (read more)
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Dr. Noa Grass

Dr. Noa Grass

Dr. Grass completed her PhD studies in Chinese History at the University of British Columbia, Canada. Currently, she is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of History in Tel Aviv University. Her work concerns issues in political economy and fiscal policy. Her research on paper money in imperial China uses its five-hundred year history to broaden our understanding of the performance of fiat currency in the economy. Its implementation in premodern economies challenges accepted theories on economic development and modernity and thus offers an important contribution to the analysis of contemporary economic patterns and a novel comparative perspective from which to reevaluate historical paths that led to the present day.   (read more)
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Rachel Gregor

Rachel Gregor

Rachel is a PhD student in the Department of Chemistry at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, in the field of Chemical Biology.  She studies the communication between bacteria: how individual bacterial cells can sense one another and act as a larger unit by synchronizing their actions, for example to produce toxins; and how the human immune system can interpret this signaling in order to fight infections. She also investigates the small molecules that govern the coexistence and competition between different species of bacteria in a complex, natural microbial community, specifically the bovine digestive system. With antibiotic resistance on the rise, Rachel hopes to contribute to a better understanding of how infections are established and what molecules are involved, which can lead to the development of alternative routes to target or prevent infection.   (read more)
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Itay Griniasty

Itay Griniasty

Itay is a PhD student in the field of physics at the Weizmann institute of science. He studies Casimir forces: an effect due to the quantum nature of elementary forces particularly electromagnetism. Casimir forces are responsible for most of the stickiness in nature, like the stiction of paint to walls. The source of the Casimir force also acts in great distances and may drive the expansion of the universe. Current theories describe Casimir forces between objects, like the paint and the wall, but fail to describe them inside objects, e.g. inside the paint that they may blow apart. Itay is extending the current theories of the Casimir force so that we may predict its effect inside media, this may affect the Casimir contribution to the expansion of the universe.  (read more)
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Dr. Noam Kaplan

Dr. Noam Kaplan

Dr. Noam Kaplan is a new faculty member at the Technion Faculty of Medicine, returning from a postdoctoral position at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He studies the physical structure of the genome, which is closely linked to genome function in both healthy and disease processes. By combining advanced computational methods with genomic experimentation, Dr. Kaplan's lab will try to decipher how the genome encodes its three-dimensional organization and how this organization mediates biological function in a range of biological systems. By developing quantitative models and testing them experimentally, he aims to go beyond descriptive genomics and gain mechanistic insights into the underlying principles of genome structure and function.  (read more)
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Ori Katz

Ori Katz

Ori is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Ben-Gurion University. His research deals with missing persons in Israel, and with the cultural space between life and death. Through field work using in-depth interviews with relevant actors (families of the missing, police, volunteer organizations, media, etc.), participation in searching for missing persons, activity in the association of the families of the missing and other events, Ori tries to find how narratives of missingness are constructed, in a field full of ambiguity and paradoxes. The research focuses in an unstudied field, in which there are only few cultural scripts, concerning both the extent of the phenomenon and the public visibility of missing soldiers, who have a significant place in the collective memory. The research may also contribute to the theoretical knowledge regarding the construction of social categories in conditions of ambiguity and uncertainty.         (read more)
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Shmuel Katz

Shmuel Katz

Shmuel is a PhD student in the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, at the Technion. His research focuses on designing new materials, also called metamaterials (“materials” made from carefully designed repeating micro-scale building blocks). The objective of the research is to understand the dynamic response of a chain composed of masses and bistable springs, springs which have two stable states (like switches), to impacts and vibrations. Careful design of the building blocks may enable the realization of a new class of energy-absorbing materials that cannot be found in nature, i.e. mechanical insulators that protect from vibrations and impacts. This work has the potential to revolutionize the field of energy-absorption, by the development of new metamaterials to be used in a range of applications, such as passenger protection, medical devices, and protective packaging of fragile components.    (read more)
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Dr. Michael Khanevsky

Dr. Michael Khanevsky

Dr. Khanevsky is a new faculty member at the Technion's Department of Mathematics, returning to Israel after postdoctoral positions at the University Libre de Bruxelles, University of Chicago and Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His research is concentrated in symplectic geometry and its interactions with geometric group theory and dynamical systems. In particular, interest are Hamiltonian deformations that describe various motions: path of a satellite, trajectory of a particle inside an accelerator or evolution of ideal fluid. Understanding geometry of such deformations is important to construct a trajectory (eg: find an optimal path for a satellite), predict future evolution of a mechanical system or reconstruct its past and deal with the stability of motion under perturbations.  (read more)
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Gal Lazarus

Gal Lazarus

Gal is a PhD student in the field of Clinical Psychology at Bar-Ilan University. His research focuses on relational motivations of approach and avoidance within couples’ romantic relationships and within psychotherapy. Particularly, Gal’s research explores how these motivations are tied to accuracy and bias in interpersonal perception of relational emotions, cognitions, and desires. Based on questionnaires filled each day (for couples) or each session (for client and patients), the research examines a variety of closeness and distance manifestations, and allows for the detection of relational fluctuations as they occur. Expanding our understanding of individuals’ closeness regulation can lead to better identification of maladaptive relational processes and development of efficient interventions for these processes in order to create more adaptive patterns of connectedness  (read more)
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Ido Levin

Ido Levin

Ido is a PhD student in the fields of non-linear and soft-matter Physics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research focuses on the shaping mechanisms and the mechanical properties of growing elastic objects and on the relation between elasticity and geometry. In particular, he is working on actuating slender gel sheets using chemical waves. These gels change their shape periodically in a controlled manner to form autonomous shape-shifting devices. Ido hopes to contribute insights that can lead toward building primitive soft machines and provide deeper understanding of their dynamics and mechanical properties.  (read more)
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Sharon Sadan Levy

Sharon Sadan Levy

Sharon is a PhD student in the Department of Learning Disabilities at the Faculty of Education at Haifa University. Her study focuses on mathematical learning difficulties among adults, which have great influence on the academic experience and on everyday life. Sharon is thoroughly examining a new aspect concerning the consistency of the arithmetic performance. She examines whether in addition to the numerical deficits characterizing this population, they also have difficulties recruiting attentional recourses when performing simple arithmetic tasks leading to an inefficient and fluctuant performance. Sharon is hoping that this study will help to better understand mathematical learning difficulties and to develop new interventions programs for improving the arithmetic performance of this population.  (read more)
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Dr. Ahmad Masarwa

Dr. Ahmad Masarwa

Dr. Masarwa completed his PhD studies in Chemistry at the Technion, working on selective metal-mediated carbon–carbon bond activation of strained compounds under the supervision of Prof. Ilan Marek. His research was recently selected for the IUPAC–Solvay International Award for Young Chemists. He continued on to postdoctoral research at UC Berkeley (USA), and currently holds a faculty position as Assistant Professor and Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Chemistry of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Dr. Masarwa's research focuses on the fields of organic – synthetic chemistry, and organometallic chemistry of strong bonds activation. The synergy between Science and Art is at the heart of his research program, leading towards unique and innovative investigations of bonds activation, and providing a deeper understanding of this challenging field.  (read more)
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Maayan Nidbach

Maayan Nidbach

Ma'ayan is a PhD student in the Department of Asian Studies at Hebrew University. Her research spans the fields of Indian Philosophy, Linguistics and Theology and it deals with the unique place of language (Sanskrit) in the writings of a new theological school from Kashmir of 10-11th centuries CE (Kashmir Shaivism) as influenced by the philosophy of Bhartṛhari, a philosopher and grammarian who lived half a century earlier. By examining the ways in which Bhartṛhari’s terminology and philosophy were revived and reinterpreted, she hopes to shed new light on an unexamined link in the history of Indian thought.   (read more)
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Dr. Dan Orbach

Dr. Dan Orbach

Dr. Orbach is a military historian who studied for more than ten years in Tel Aviv, Tokyo and Cambridge MA, receiving a PhD degree from Harvard University. As a historian, commentator and political blogger, he  has published extensively on German, Japanese, Chinese, Israeli and Middle Eastern history, with a special focus on military resistance, disobedience, rebellions and political assassinations. His two latest books, The Plots Against Hitler and Curse on this Country - Japanese Military Insubordination and the Origins of the Pacific War are forthcoming in Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Cornell University Press, respectively. They will also be published in Hebrew and Italian translation. Currently, Dr. Orbach is working on a comparative history, first of its kind, of military adventurers in the 20th Century. Dr. Orbach has recently taken up a faculty position as Senior Lecturer in the Hebrew University's Department of Asian Studies.   (read more)
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Nirit Pilosof

Nirit Pilosof

Nirit is a PhD student of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion. Her research explores the connection between healthcare, architecture and time, acknowledging both the challenge of planning hospital facilities to meet the rapid progress of medicine and technology, and the limitation of current tools to predict and evaluate the design. In her study, Nirit proposes to develop a method to facilitate the evaluation of hospital design strategies for change, by simulating ‘what if’ scenarios. A computational use-model simulation will enhance design optimization, collaboration and knowledgeable decision-making by architects and hospital directors during the design process and throughout the life cycle of the hospital.  (read more)
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Lotem Pinchover

Lotem Pinchover

Lotem is a PhD student of Art History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In her research, she focuses on the presence of Jerusalem in medieval Saxon convents, as expressed in their art and cult. The reference to the holy places in Jerusalem includes the stations along the Via Dolorosa (The Stations of the Cross), the Holy Sepulchre Church, Christ’s Tomb and more. In northern Germany, these representations were especially common in the visual tradition of female communities and were repeated in a variety of media: architecture, sculpture, reliefs, illustrations and texts. Lotem aims to offer novel reasons for the popularity and centrality of Jerusalem representations in the art and cult of the medieval nuns. Through this reading she hopes to reveal more on the relationship between gender and iconography involving sacred topography.  (read more)
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Dr. Vladimir Reinharz

Dr. Vladimir Reinharz

Dr. Reinharz completed his PhD studies in Computer Science at McGill University. He is currently pursuing a postdoctoral research at the Computer Science Department of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are ubiquitous in life and perform a vast array of essential functions. Structured RNAs fold into complex three-dimensional configurations to achieve these functions.  Dr. Reinharz develops mathematical models to understand the relationship between sequence and structure, to determine the functions of known RNAs and design artificial ones with novel applications.  (read more)
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Yuval Rubinstein

Yuval Rubinstein

Yuval is a Masters Student of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion.  His research deals with ‘Dynamic Urban Planning’ and ‘Masterplans’.  More specifically, his research proposes a new dynamic urban planning model, based on urban information databases and on advanced Information and Communication Technologies (ICT).  Today's masterplans suffer from many issues, such as the reliance on irrelevant databases and poor adaptation to the dynamic environment of the city.  These issues and other problems, make the masterplans’ goals and visions difficult to follow, hence impairing the healthy development of the city.  By integrating ICT into the masterplan, Yuval aims to create a dynamic urban model structure, that will actively change and adjust according to the changing needs of the city and its citizens.  This model could assist planers and decision makers in developing and operating cities according to their visions, while keeping their planning relevant and fulfilling the city’s ongoing needs.  (read more)
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Dr. Talya Sadeh

Dr. Talya Sadeh

Dr. Sadeh is a new faculty member at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, returning to Israel from a postdoctoral position in Canada, at the Baycrest Centre and the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on the neuro-cognitive mechanisms of episodic memory—the unique human capacity to re-live events from the past—and asks questions like: Why do we forget? How is information organized in memory? How is memory affected by pre - and post-learning processes? These topics have implications not only for theory, but also for practice in treatment of memory loss.  (read more)
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Dr. Leia Saltzman

Dr. Leia Saltzman

Dr. Saltzman is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Hebrew University in the School of Social Work and Social Welfare. She received her PhD in Social Work from Boston College. Dr. Saltzman infuses a strengths-based approach to studying the process of adaptation following exposure to trauma. She has participated in both national and international collaborations with leading experts in the field of psychological trauma. She is passionate about translating research to mental health policies and clinical practice with the goal of promoting well-being, building stronger families, and more cohesive communities that can withstand the impact of mass trauma events.  (read more)
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Bridget Schvarcz

Bridget Schvarcz

Brigitta is a PhD Student in the Department of Linguistics at Bar-Ilan University. Her research explores the grammar of counting in Hungarian.  Languages like English use numbers with count nouns, as in “three cats”, (but not "three furnitures"). Languages such as Mandarin use classifiers, expressing the same meaning by “three units of cat” (parallel to the English “three pieces of furniture”). Unusually, Hungarian uses both systems. Brigitta’s central question is how this hybrid system works, and why Hungarian has such a system.  She hopes to understand more about the relation between language and numbers, and about how counting systems work in grammar.  (read more)
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Dr. Tamar Segal-Peretz

Dr. Tamar Segal-Peretz

Dr. Segal - Peretz is a new faculty member at the Technion in the Department of Chemical Engineering, returning to Israel from a postdoctoral fellowship at Argonne National Laboratory and at the University of Chicago. Her research interests lie in the area of polymer-based functional nanostructures, ranging from self-assembly of polymers to advanced three-dimensional characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography. Spontaneous self-assembly of polymers can be harnessed to form structures that range from 3 to 50 nm, which are difficult to obtain using conventional patterning techniques, and have tremendous potential in nanofabrication and separation applications. Dr. Segal – Peretz's research will focus on understanding and developing new materials and processes that would enable the fabrication of the future’s optical and semiconductor devices as well as separation membranes for purification and water treatment processes.  (read more)
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Yaniv Sela

Yaniv Sela

Yaniv is a PhD student in the school of neuroscience at Tel Aviv University. His research focus is sleep, and the mechanism of the sensory disconnection from surrounding environment, in order to explain the profound loss of consciousness and responsiveness during sleep. Yaniv aims to discover where along the neural pathways does the propagation of sensory signals stop during natural sleep, and what brain mechanism mediates it. Furthermore, he hopes to advance our understanding of the purpose of sleep, which is evolutionarily preserved behavior while at the same time entails many risks due to the lack of responsiveness. Understanding sensory disconnection might help to better characterize neurological conditions such as attention disorders and insomnia, improve clinical procedures of general anesthesia, and shed light on one of the most fundamental unresolved questions in biology.  (read more)
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Ido Sivan Sevilla

Ido Sivan Sevilla

Ido is a PhD Candidate at the School of Public Policy and Government at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Ido's research deals with the design of public policies and regulations in cyberspace. His main research question is how national security and civil liberties complement and contradict in the digital age. Ido is conducting a comparative analysis between two central political systems, ​and traces the development of regulation through legislation, policy institutions, government orders, court rulings, and policy guidelines. ​While the literature is rich with theoretical debates over the tensions between security and liberty, Ido examines empirically, over the course of Forty years, how these values are de-facto constructed in the technological sphere. ​Ido's research aims to increase our understanding on how regulation is evolved, and shed light on the construction of fundamental principles within our current information society.  (read more)
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Dr. Amit Sitt

Dr. Amit Sitt

Dr. Sitt is a new faculty member at Tel Aviv University’s School of Chemistry, returning to Israel following postdoctoral training in Columbia University in the USA, and in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany. His research interests lie in the fields of smart programmable materials and self-assembly in the nano and microscale regimes. Dr. Sitt's lab will focus on developing and studying materials that can be programmed to hold and process chemical information. Similarly to a computer program, upon execution the chemically coded program embedded in the material will return a well-defined output– for instance a change of the shape or in the chemical nature of the material. Such materials, which mimic nature’s approach of coding information in biochemical structures, are poised to lead to the discovery of new phenomena, shed light on the principles of similar processes in biological systems, and lead to the development of novel applications in the fields of biomedicine and smart materials.  (read more)
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Mark Shusterman

Mark Shusterman

Mark is a PhD student in Tel-Aviv University. His research focuses on the solution of problems in pure Mathematics that deal with properties of prime numbers, algebraic structures and their symmetries. Mark's research leads to insights on abstract Mathematical structures such as groups, fields, and manifolds. Part of the research is joint with graduate, undergraduate, and high school students. Some of the theoretical results find their applications in Computer Science, in areas such as Cryptography and Coding Theory.  (read more)
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Gal Waisel

Gal Waisel

Gal is an M.Arch student at Tel Aviv University, Azrieli School of Architecture. Her study is focusing on photographic images showing the creation and activity of the Israeli "people’s house", a cultural and social framework that was adopted by all forms of settlement in Eretz Israel, along with the desire of creation an educational and cultural melting pot integrated into the emerging Zionist society. Gal is examining the relationship between the people's houses architecture, its visual images, and the way they are formed into both private and the collective memories, all through formal and personal photographs of different people's houses taken around the 40’s-50’s period and their usages. This study's goal is to define visual characteristic patterns of these images, proving the importance of architectural imagery within the field of architecture, implementation of ideas and messages and construction of memory, at individual, community, and national levels. Gal hopes that this study will yield fresh knowledge related to visual media as a narratives creator and stabilizer, narratives that were formed during the period when the Israeli society behavioral patterns were established and enhanced until nowadays.  (read more)
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Ran Weksler

Ran Weksler

Ran is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Economics and the Center for the Study of Rationality in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research deals with decision making in economic situations, i.e., situations where agents (individuals and companies) seek to maximize their economic benefit, while taking into account the behavior of their opponents. Ran's study is part of a growing literature in the field of micro-economics theory that examines classical economic situations (CPI prices, supply and demand), which were tested in the past under the assumption that all parties are perfectly informed about the situation, and is now challenged under a new premise that information is only partial. The importance of his research lies in working with complex analytical models that are strongly linked to economic reality.  (read more)
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