Bridget Schvarcz

Brigitta is a PhD Student in the Department of Linguistics at Bar-Ilan University. Her research explores the grammar of counting in Hungarian.  Languages like English use numbers with count nouns, as in “three cats”, (but not "three furnitures"). Languages such as Mandarin use classifiers, expressing the same meaning by “three units of cat” (parallel to the English “three pieces of furniture”). Unusually, Hungarian uses both systems. Brigitta’s central question is how this hybrid system works, and why Hungarian has such a system.  She hopes to understand more about the relation between language and numbers, and about how counting systems work in grammar. 

  • Schvarcz Brigitta R. In Press. Language Awareness and EFL Teachers’ Professional Identity. Constructions of Identity VIII. Cluj Napoca: Casa Cărţii de Ştiinţă.
     
  • Schvarcz Brigitta R. 2016. Measure Constructions in Hungarian and the Semantics of the –nyi Suffix. In: A. Lipták and H. van der Hulst szerk., Approaches to Hungarian 15: Papers from the 2015 Leiden Conference. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
     
  • Schvarcz Brigitta R. and Susan Rothstein. 2016. Hungarian classifier constructions and the mass/count distinction. In: A. Lipták and H. van der Hulst szerk., Approaches to Hungarian 15: Papers from the 2015 Leiden Conference. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
     
  • Khrizman Keren, Fred Landman, Suzi Lima Susan Rothstein and Brigitta R. Schvarcz.  Portion readings are count readings, not measure readings. The Proceedings of the 20th Amsterdam Colloquium.
I volunteer at the Starlight activity-center for sick children at the Schneider hospital.
Once a week, I play with children of various ages and help them to catch up on their homework and often provide emotional support to their parents.
The children come in to the center in a sad, uncertain and nervous state, even frightened, and they always leave with a smile on their face. Their timeout at the center is real benefit to them: through games and crafts, children disconnect from their pains and aches, while this happy relief also contributes to their recovery.
Through this voluntary activity, I practice putting other people’s needs in front of mine. Whenever I am at the hospital, I feel as if the world outside stops: no matter how busy I am, how heavy my workload is, I fully devote my attention to this soul-fulfilling work. I give myself unconditionally to the children, and this helps me put life into perspective.