Alumni 2015-2016

 

David Adraee

David Adraee

David is a Masters student of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion. His research explores the social, functional and historical significance of private open space (POS) in large housing estates and how it has changed over time. Using Yad Eliyahu neighborhood as a case study, David examines how these spaces are unique and fulfill a different function than their equivalent in the typical urban fabric buildings in central Tel Aviv. David hopes that recognition of this unique resource can make both a scholarly and pragmatic contribution to the current urban planning discourse.   (read more)
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Don Butler

Don Butler

Don completed his PhD studies in the Department of Anthropology and Archaeology at the University of Calgary, Canada. He recently started his postdoctoral research at Haifa University in the field of micro-archaeology. His research pioneers a non–invasive Raman microscopy protocol for fingerprinting fish processing residues adhered to the surfaces of stone tools. Don hopes that the research will contribute to refining methodologies for recovering micro–archaeological evidence indicative of fishing industries among ancient hunter–gatherers in Israel, in turn providing evidence for some of the oldest fisheries in the world.  (read more)
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Lena Arbov

Lena Arbov

Lena is a Masters student of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion. In her research she wishes to highlight the characteristics and strength of architectural graphic representations in forming our spatial, physical and design perceptions. Lena's research analyzes the varied ways that architectural space is represented through methods that reflect the connection between space and time. Lena hopes to start a practice that combines architectural design with research and critical writing which would challenge certain current views on contemporary architecture.  (read more)
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Michael Danziger

Michael Danziger

Michael is a PhD student in the field of Physics at Bar Ilan University. His research extends the study of interdependent and multi-layered interacting networks. Michael aims to create a theory of interacting networks which will lead to better understanding, prediction, and manipulation of large complex systems. Understanding these relations can effectively model real world systems, such as social, ecological, biochemical, physiological and technological systems, and shed light on our increasingly complex world.  (read more)
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Gabriel Schwake

Gabriel Schwake

Gabriel is a Masters student at the Azrieli School of Architecture in Tel Aviv University. His research investigates urban renewal projects in the Tel Aviv – Jaffa area and their respond to random changes. Gabriel looks at these processes through the prism of LeFebvre's philosophy of the citizens' "right to the city" – their right to take part in the process of urbanization and thus create a city more suitable for its dwellers on the one hand, and more flexible on the other. By comparing the different methods of demolition and regeneration of earlier projects such as Manshiya and later projects such as Kerem Hatemanim, Gabriel hopes to make a clear statement about planning methods and practical implementation.     (read more)
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Nathan Goldstein

Nathan Goldstein

Nathan is a PhD student in the field of Economics at Bar Ilan University. His research deals with the process of forming expectations and its implications for macroeconomic analysis, stressing the role of information rigidities. By challenging the dominant literature, Nathan hopes to contribute to the new wave of research on macroeconomic expectations, using new approaches and advanced techniques to identify information rigidities in expectations and characterize their nature. He also wishes to extend the new theory to the open economy as seen in Israel. In doing so he hopes to develop recommendations for local economic policy.  (read more)
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Ruthie Kaplan

Ruthie Kaplan

Ruthie is a Masters student of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion. Her research focuses on the city of Lodz, Poland, during the 19th century, as a unique example of industrial urban development, influenced by economical, governmental and social circumstances. Ruthie wishes to explore aspects of the city that have not yet been addressed, such as the tension between urban planning and everyday city life, and the Jewish contribution to the urbanity and industrialization of Lodz.   (read more)
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​Jamie Levin

​Jamie Levin

Jamie completed his PhD studies in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto, and is currently pursuing his postdoctoral research in International Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.  His research looks at the role of third parties in resolving the problem of credible commitments in internal conflict. He uses the Israeli – Palestinian conflict and specifically the Oslo peace process as a case study to provide insights on conditions in which third parties may or may not be an effective bridge between the two sides. Jamie's research holds real world implications not only for the Israeli – Palestinian peace process, but also for third-party intervention more broadly.   (read more)
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Dr. Paul Greenham

Dr. Paul Greenham

Paul completed his PhD studies at the University of Toronto. He is currently pursuing his postdoctoral research at the Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas at Tel Aviv University. In his research, Paul investigates Isaac Newton’s use of prophetic texts and interpretative guides—especially those drawn from Jewish and Arab traditions—in Newton's writings on biblical prophecy recorded in the Yahuda manuscript collection. By knowing the degree to which Newton used texts and the manner of that use, we can determine his novel contributions to scholarship and to both textual and non-textual methods of reasoning in the sciences. Paul hopes his research will contribute to debates on the place of biblical hermeneutics in the development of scientific method and thus to play an important role in wider discussions of the relationship between science and religion.  (read more)
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Dr. Tsipora Mankovsky-Arnold

Dr. Tsipora Mankovsky-Arnold

Tsipora completed her PhD studies in Clinical Psychology at McGill University.  She is currently pursuing her postdoctoral research jointly at the Technion and the University of Haifa, in the field of pain.  Her research employs the use of quantitative sensory testing paradigms to help characterize a novel potential risk factor for problematic recovery following musculoskeletal injury.  Tsipora believes that the findings from her research will help to identify those individuals who are more likely to develop chronic pain and disability, as well as point to new avenues of intervention to improve the recovery trajectory.     (read more)
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Dr. Lital Sever

Dr. Lital Sever

Lital completed her PhD studies in Biology at the University of Waterloo, Canada, and is currently pursuing her postdoctoral research at the Weizmann Institute of Science, in the field of Immunology. Her research focuses on the cellular pathways which dictate the development, survival and function of B cells in particular plasma cells which secrete antibodies in response to a pathogen. By better understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the survival and function of plasma cells, Lital hopes to uncover novel therapeutic targets and new diagnostic tools for autoimmune diseases and hematological malignancies such as multiple myeloma.  (read more)
Publications – Webpage/Blog – Community Engagement