History, Settlement, and Construction in Israeli Modern Architecture
May 26, 2015 || Noor, Jaffa

Nowadays, when Israeli architecture has difficulty connecting to its past and seeing architectural acts as some sort of indicator for contemporary interpretation, it seems ephemeral and detached from the ethical principles of architecture, an architecture that leaves room for recollection and (historical) reflection as integral parts in building (designing) the future. 
Architectural activity derives from a sense of responsibility towards tradition, but also towards innovation. It takes place between what has already been done and what the architect will do in the future. Between remembering things that are part of our legacy, and something new which already incorporates the nucleus of what is still to come. This is not a simple act of remembering; it is a process of interpreting the memory. Remembering is not the retrieval of objective information from an internal reservoir; rather it plays a complex role involving other factors that push for change and innovation.
In the work of architecture, every time something emerges from memory, any creative manipulation of that content leads to an alteration of the memory itself. Any future in architecture has a connection to the past. But the past does not cast its shadow on the creator’s imagination. Hence, these memories do not shut out the future, they bring about changes, revolutions and variations that win our hearts, and when we give them a new meaning, we discover the possibilities of our own existence. The memory I am talking about is not ‘frozen time’ or a particular structure. On the contrary – it is unquantifiable dynamic time

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