Fellows 2017 - 2018

 

Eliran Arazi

Eliran Arazi

Eliran Arazi is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Eliran is carrying out prolonged fieldwork among the indigenous Cabiyari of the Colombian Amazon. His research focuses on the relation between social evaluation and relations of power and hierarchy among group members, whose systems of beliefs, values, customs and modes of actions attest to a unique configuration of the distinction between nature and culture, which is markedly different from ours. Eliran uses the participant observation approach, whereby he learns the Cabiyari language and takes part in everyday activities, ceremonies, leisure activities and political gatherings. In addition, he interviews group members and documents their rich mythology. Beyond his contribution to regional, political and moral ethnography, Eliran wishes to pave the way to a comparative study of the conceptions of honor in societies with different conceptualizations of the nature-culture divide.    (read more)
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Guy Austern

Guy Austern

Guy Austern is a PhD student in the Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. His research concerns the rationalization of architectural geometry, seeking ways to evaluate and improve concrete elements and better suit them to fabrication constraints of their molds. By bridging between computer science and architecture, he proposes computational tools for the analysis and optimization of architectural geometry, adapting it to digital fabrication processes such as CNC milling, hot-wire cutting, and printing. Additionally, he seeks new mold fabrication techniques that will be better suited to the requirements of the architectural industry. By introducing fabrication awareness into the design process at an early stage, Guy hopes to adapt architectural design to the expanding world of digital fabrication.  (read more)
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Ran Eitan Abutbul

Ran Eitan Abutbul

Ran Eitan Abutbul is a PhD student in the Department of Materials Engineering at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. His research is devoted to the properties of nanomaterials that belong to the semiconductor family (such as silicone) and particularly to the study of a new family of materials which were recently discovered in his lab. His research is designed to develop techniques for preparing these new materials and specifying their properties. Ran uses advanced microscopy and crystallography in order to study the crystalline structure and morphology of these materials at nanoscale. Through these studies, he aims to identify materials that could contribute to effective use of renewable energy.  (read more)
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Idit Ben Or

Idit Ben Or

Idit Ben Or is a PhD student in History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a member of the “Materials of Change” research group at the Mandel Scholion Interdisciplinary Research Center in the Humanities and Jewish Studies. Her research focuses on money in early modern England, a time when much economic activity was locally based and daily economic life was dependent on money that was coined and printed by local actors, in addition to monarchal coinage. Idit's research examines how the government and the public viewed local money, its authority, value, usages, as well as its sociocultural meanings. She combines economic theory and practice, history of daily life and material culture, to evoke questions on the connection between money, an object found in every pocket, and broader sociocultural and economic concerns.   (read more)
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Yonatan Chemla

Yonatan Chemla

Yonatan Chemla is a PhD student in synthetic biology at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. His research focuses on the molecular biology of bacteria, and particularly the genetic code that governs protein synthesis and regulation of several model bacteria. Yonatan aims to understand how the context of the “words” and “sentences” encoded in DNA language affects their meanings. Namely, how the same word can have distinct cellular functions in different genomic contexts. His research seeks to solve open questions of the bacterial genetic language and thereby contribute to the body of knowledge about them as well as develop novel tools aimed at improving protein production and engineering, which are essential to the biotechnological and pharma industries.  (read more)
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​Adi Doron

​Adi Doron

Adi Doron is a PhD student at the ELSC Center for Brain Sciences at the Hebrew  University of Jerusalem. Her research addresses the way complex representations of the environment are encoded in the brain. She investigates how non-spatial internal factors, such as goals and rewards with different values, are combined with external environmental features to create a mental representation of the self in space.  Adi studies differences in brain activity that result from various expectations regarding a given environment. To this end, she uses advanced imaging techniques in combination with a virtual reality system, which enable the study of different types of brain cells during goal-directed behavior.  (read more)
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Ifat Gavish is a PhD student in the Department of Counseling and Human Development at the University of Haifa's Faculty of Education. She studies the prosocial behavior of adolescents and adults, investigating mechanisms that may explain value-behavior relations and value-change-behavior relations and the role cognitive components play. Ifat proposes an integrative empirical framework for examining how attention and interpretation influence the connection between values and prosocial behavior, following intervention. Her vision is to lay the ground for comprehensive educational intervention, which would promote self-transcendence values, individual well-being, and a healthier society.   (read more)
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​Yuval Givon

​Yuval Givon

Yuval Givon is a PhD student in the School of Historical Studies at Tel Aviv University. His research addresses the early modern dialogue between China and Europe, and particularly the circulation of knowledge between the two civilizations during the Ming-Qing dynastic transition in the mid-17th century. Though generally seen mainly as a local Chinese event, Yuval highlights this transition as an episode in global history, particularly in terms of its role in shaping new categories of knowledge and opening new channels of communication between China and Europe. At the heart of the study lies the Jesuit China Mission, which operated at the time as an almost exclusive communication channel between China and Europe. By analyzing Jesuit sources in Chinese and European languages, Yuval sheds light on the circulation of cross-cultural knowledge in what is sometimes called the First Global Era.   (read more)
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Idan Haritan

Idan Haritan

Idan is a PhD student in the Faculty of Chemistry at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. In his chemical-theoretical research, Idan studies the interaction of light and matter. Idan hopes to implement his theoretical findings in biology to investigate light-driven biological reactions. Idan aims to analyze these reactions, while taking into account the presence of light throughout the reaction. This analysis will represent a breakthrough compared to current analyses, where light is considered a mere initiator, and the reactions are perceived as a sequence of events occurring without its presence. In that, Idan hopes to explain quantum effects that are not yet fully understood in biology, particularly those related to photosynthesis and light vision.  (read more)
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Omer Karin

Omer Karin

Omer Karin is a PhD student Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology at the Weizmann Institute of Science. Omer studies design principles of cellular tissue communication circuits. His research seeks to uncover the logic behind the decisions cells make, and why this decision-making fails in disease. To do so, he uses computational and mathematical models based on stochastic system theory, population genetics, and control theory, and collaborates with experimentalists to test the predictions of these models. Omer's projects aim to create a quantitative framework that will help understand cellular functional processes in health and disease.  (read more)
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Ohad Kohn

Ohad Kohn

Ohad Kohn is a PhD student at Tel Aviv University's School of Cultural Studies. He specializes in German and Yiddish literature in their inter-lingual and intercultural junctures. Ohad’s research focuses on the poetic language of Paul Celan (1920-1970), one of the greatest German poets in the second half of the 20th century. He seeks to resolve the two fundamental issues in Celan’s reception, one informed by the other; his extraordinary German language on the one hand and his elusive yet ubiquitous Jewishness on the other. The study uncovers the Jewish affinities and registers encoded into Celan’s unique poetic language in light of the poet's ironic use of the originally antisemitic term Judaization (Verjudung) of literature. By closely reading Celan’s extraordinary poetic language structures in the context of Jewish linguistic and literary traditions, Ohad offers a novel framework for understanding the role of Jewishness in European literary modernism after the Holocaust.  (read more)
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Shachar Livne

Shachar Livne

Shachar Livne is a PhD student in the Department of General and Comparative Literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her primary research interest lies in the interrelations between Italian and English literatures in the later Middle Ages and Renaissance, with particular emphasis on the poetry of the 14th-century canonical poets: Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, and Chaucer. Her comparative study closely examines four poems, each depicting a dream-vision that the poet had prior to writing. Through close analyses of these poetical works, Shachar documents a critical moment in the history of a poetical genre that was widespread across medieval and renaissance Europe and illustrates the crucial impact Italian poetry had on English poetry that developed thereafter. Such an investigation promotes the comparative study of Italian and English literatures, as well as the study of the medieval dream-vision genre.  (read more)
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​Towibah Majdoob

​Towibah Majdoob

Towibah Majdoob is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tel Aviv University. Her research investigates late singlehood as experienced and interpreted by single men and women in Palestinian society in Israel. This phenomenon has been previously addressed in sociological literature mainly through the perspective of hegemonic Western society and dominant, gendered worldviews. Towibah's research, in contrast, explores it through the intersections of socio-political, gender-based, ethnic, national and geographic positions. Based on more than forty interviews with women and men, her study demonstrates that singlehood is not a uniform social category, but rather a diverse one that varies with the interrelations between these positions. Towibah's research enriches the literature that has yet to analyze this phenomenon in Palestinian society in Israel.  (read more)
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Lihi Matza

Lihi Matza

Lihi Matza is a Master's student in the Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. Her research examines urban planning and spatial development practices in Israel in the neoliberal era, as reflected in the regeneration of former urban industrial areas. Such regeneration projects represent a growing phenomenon in Israel during the last three decades. Despite this growing popularity, however, there is almost no literature on its local manifestations. Using analysis of regeneration projects from around the world and of three local case studies, Lihi aims to characterize the various planning and development approaches to the regeneration of these areas, their positive and negative implications, and the planning culture that informs them. In so doing, she seeks to contribute to the formulation of a multi-dimensional and comprehensive planning policy regarding the regeneration of these areas in Israel.  (read more)
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Dan Mikulincer

Dan Mikulincer

Dan Mikulincer is a PhD student of Mathematics at the Weizmann Institute of Science. His research involves probability and high-dimensional geometry, which is central to modern statistics. Dan examines concentration-of-measure phenomena and their interrelations with dimension, particularly the central limit theorem – a universal phenomenon according to which so long as a large enough sample is taken from a certain population, its average would have identical properties, independently of the sampling population. Dan quantifies the dependency of the theorem on the dimension or number of parameters of the sample using stochastic calculus tools, which have gained prominence in financial mathematics. By using these novel methods , Dan hopes to create new statistical tools applicable to our modern environment, and to shed new light on existing statistical tools when applied in high dimensions. These insights can find their application in a myriad of other fields by introducing new approximation and sampling algorithms.  (read more)
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Nadav Outmezguine

Nadav Outmezguine

Nadav is a PhD student at the Tel-Aviv University School of Physics, and is currently a visiting graduate student at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. His research is in theoretical high-energy physics, the field of physics that depicts the fundamental ingredients of the universe, the way they interact, and the forces operating on them. The vast majority of observed natural phenomena are very well explained by physical theories. Nevertheless, some discrepancies between them and the findings of various experiments have motivated theories and models whose validation requires experiments of greater precision. While significant effort is invested in testing these models in controlled experiments using detectors and particle accelerators, Nadav’s research takes an alternative approach, asking what these models would imply for our picture of the universe, galaxies and stars and how these implications could be revealed through astrophysical observation.   (read more)
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Noa Rom

Noa Rom

Noa Rom is a PhD student at the Hebrew University School of Education. She researches educational policy issues affecting the school system. Her dissertation uses social network theory to examine the implementation of the recent information and communications technology (ICT) reform in Israel’s elementary schools. Noa is interested in how teachers view and implement technology in the classroom, and how their social and professional interactions and exchanges impact their sense of “ownership” of the reform. By focusing on teacher networks, Noa seeks to uncover the social mechanisms that motivate school improvement processes related to teachers’ engagement and learning. Her study advances research on the scaling up of educational reform and promotes a scholarly discourse about the potential of teachers to lead successful change efforts in Israeli and other school systems.   (read more)
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​Yair Segev

​Yair Segev

Yair is a PhD student in the Department of Chemical Physics at the Weizmann Institute of Science. In his research, Yair studies chemical and physical phenomena unique to extremely low temperatures. Contrary to the physics that we experience daily, at temperatures close to absolute zero the interactions between particles of matter are dominated by quantum mechanics, and atoms start behaving as waves. Yair uses experimental and computational tools borrowed from aerospace engineering to research and develop a novel cooling technique that would bring molecules to these temperatures. Using this method, he aims to observe the coldest chemical reactions ever identified on the molecular level, and even hopes to create new states of matter, very different from those familiar to us today.   (read more)
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Haran Sened

Haran Sened

Haran Sened is a PhD student in the Department of Psychology at Bar Ilan University. He develops methods to help romantic partners understand each other's thoughts and feelings. Working with couples in one-time meetings in the lab and in short daily training programs at home over several weeks, he examines methods such as providing mutual feedback and increasing motivation for emotional understanding. Haran investigates how improved emotional understanding contributes to the quality of the relationship and the partners' satisfaction with it. His research will contribute to the development of new tools for studying emotional understanding among couples, which will have practical potential in couples counselling.  (read more)
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Ohad Sorek

Ohad Sorek

Ohad Sorek is an architect, a Master's student at Tel Aviv University's Azrieli School of Architecture, and a lecturer at Bezalel Academy. Ohad’s research examines “Hebraic architecture” – a term he has coined to propose a new branch in architectural theory. In order to understand the scope and unique characteristics of this proposed "paper architecture", Ohad reads Jewish traditional texts, attempting to extrapolate paradigms and develop original stances in relation to contemporary architectural discourse. Ohad relies on autonomist and occasionally utopist Jewish legal texts ("halacha") and rabbinical interpretation and lore ("aggadah"), as opposed to historical or archaeological sources, adapting them to conventional architectural medium and discourse, in order to lay down guidelines for further research in this field.  (read more)
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Karen Yirmiya

Karen Yirmiya

Karen Yirmiya is a PhD student in the Psychology Department at Bar-Ilan University. Her study focuses on identifying resiliency and vulnerability factors related to the development of  psychopathology among children exposed to ongoing terrorism threats. Karen examines the effects of environmental and biological factors on the mental condition of children living near the Gaza Strip, compared to children living elsewhere in Israel. The children were monitored for more than a decade, from infancy to adolescence, with the aim of elucidating the contribution of parent-child relationships, as well as hormones related to stress (cortisol) and affiliation (oxytocin), to the development of psychopathology given prolonged exposure to trauma. Karen's study is unique in its longitudinal follow-up of children exposed to the same trauma through various developmental stages in their lives, combining biological, neurological, psychological, and psychiatric approaches. Through her research, she hopes to improve the understanding and early identification risk factors associated with subsequent trauma-related psychopathology.   (read more)
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Tom Zahavy

Tom Zahavy

Tom Zahavy is a PhD student at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. His research focuses on developing Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms that learn to make decisions, particularly through reinforcements. To do so, Tom uses artificial neural networks (ANNs) – computational models that are used, for example,  in Google Translate and Facebook’s face recognition algorithm. ANNs are large and complex models; researchers know how to train them but lack the tools to understand how they work, thus they are considered as “black boxes”. To address this problem, Tom has developed tools to visualize and analyze the AI brain, allowing researchers to see the world through AI “eyes” and helping humans understand how AI “thinks”.   (read more)
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Dr. Genevieve Allaire-Duquette

Dr. Genevieve Allaire-Duquette

Dr. Genevieve Allaire-Duquette completed her PhD studies at Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), and is currently pursuing her postdoctoral research at Tel Aviv University's School of Education. Her work focuses on understanding mechanisms of reasoning in science and mathematics using cognitive neuroscience methods. More specifically, she is interested in the mechanisms underlying the ability to overcome intuitive interference to formal/logical reasoning. To do so, she uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how various educational interventions alter brain activity. She will examine changes in brain activation patterns following different types of educational interventions in quantitative reasoning. Working at the frontiers between neuroscience, psychology and education, Dr. Allaire-Duquette hopes to identify brain patterns specific to the various types of interventions, which could enable educators to make informed decisions about the nature and the intensity of the their use of interventions, tasks and examples in various educational settings.  (read more)
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Dr. Adam Dor-On

Dr. Adam Dor-On

Dr. Adam Dor-On completed his PhD in pure mathematics at the University of Waterloo, Canada, and is now a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Mathematics of the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. His research deals with non-commutative analysis, where functional analysis and operator theory are used to solve problems motivated by applications in quantum information theory, dynamical systems and the mathematical foundation of quantum mechanics. Dr. Dor-On’s research reveals new connections with classical mathematical theories, and uses tools from geometry, probability, graph theory, dynamics and group theory. It is designed to develop new perspectives in order to solve various problems in these fields, and in order to unify, simplify and expand existing theories to develop novel approaches to tackling unyielding problems.  (read more)
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Dr. Trevor Janes

Dr. Trevor Janes

Dr. Trevor Janes has completed his PhD in inorganic chemistry at the University of Toronto, where he studied actor ligand-metal complexes and their reactivity towards CO2. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Organic Chemistry at the Weizmann Institute of Science. Dr. Janes' research focuses on the design and synthesis of organometallic catalysts for the discovery and development of new and more efficient methods for producing organic compounds. To this end, metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) has been a particularly powerful tool in reactions that either split or form hydrogen gas. Dr. Janes’ goal is to manipulate hydrogen using MLC-inspired catalysts that are simpler, cheaper, and less toxic than those currently in use. If achieved, greater understanding of the applied features of MLC-type reactivity will be gained, and beneficial economic and environmental effects are foreseeable.  (read more)
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Dr. Deni Kasa

Dr. Deni Kasa

Dr. Deni Kasa completed his PhD at the University of Toronto and is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Tel Aviv University's Department of English and American Studies. His research explores the religious origins of modernity. His new book project, The Anti-Trinitarian Origins of Liberalism, argues that the forerunners of liberalism—especially John Milton, Hugo Grotius, and John Locke—imagined freedom of worship and freedom of speech by drawing from anti-Trinitarianism, a 17th-century Christian heresy. Based on medieval Jewish scholarship, the anti-Trinitarians saw Jesus as a human teacher rather than the Son of God; Milton, Grotius, and Locke used this argument to promote interfaith tolerance. The project aims to prove that while today liberalism facilitates interfaith dialogue, historically it was the interfaith dialogue between Jews and Christians that produced liberalism.  (read more)
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Dr. Yiska Loewenberg Weisband

Dr. Yiska Loewenberg Weisband

Dr. Loewenberg Weisband completed her PhD in the field of epidemiology at Ohio State University and is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the National Program for Quality Indicators in Community Healthcare (QICH) at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She specializes in maternal and child health, specifically labor and delivery outcomes. Utilizing national data from Israel’s four health funds, she is developing new healthcare quality indicators in the field of reproductive health. The data provided by these indicators will enable policymakers to identify groups at risk for negative delivery results in order to promote their health and better target the healthcare of pregnant women.   (read more)
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Dr. Devin Trudeau

Dr. Devin Trudeau

Dr. Devin Trudeau is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Biomolecular Sciences at the Weizmann Institute of Science. His work aims to improve photosynthesis and carbon fixation in plants by creating more energetically efficient synthetic metabolic pathways. He uses protein engineering to create new enzymes that catalyze these reactions at high rates. His work is an important step to understanding the limitations of natural plant metabolism, and how it may be engineered to make more sustainable and productive agriculture.  (read more)
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Dr. Amir Bashan

Dr. Amir Bashan

Dr. Amir Bashan is a new faculty member at the Physics Department of Bar-Ilan University, returning to Israel from a postdoctoral position at Harvard Medical School. His research focuses on developing and applying novel computational methods from statistical physics and network theory to understand various high-dimensional biological systems. In particular, Dr. Bashan studies human associated microbial communities which play important roles in health and diseases, alongside cellular activity such as gene expression in single cells. These complex and dynamical systems are governed by underlying networks of ecological interactions, such as in the case of microbial communities, or regulatory interactions between genes. Dr. Bashan's research will contribute to a better understanding of these systems, which is key in developing diagnostic and therapeutic applications.  (read more)
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Dr. Yonit Hochberg

Dr. Yonit Hochberg

Dr. Yonit Hochberg is a new faculty member at the Racah Institute of Physics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, having completed postdoctoral studies at Berkeley and Cornell. As a theoretical high-energy physicist, she addresses fundamental questions left unanswered by the Standard Model of particle physics, such as: What is dark matter? What happened to all the antimatter? And why is the weak force so much stronger than gravity? These are several of many indications that there must be new physics beyond the Standard Model. Dr. Hochberg’s research focuses on the phenomenology of new particles and interactions, with emphasis on dark matter. She studies new ideas in the exploration of dark matter, proposing new theories as well as novel experiments to detect dark particles on Earth in order to identify the fundamental constituents of Nature.  (read more)
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Dr. Ido Kaminer

Dr. Ido Kaminer

Dr. Ido Kaminer is a new faculty member at the Technion Faculty of Electrical Engineering, returning from a postdoc at MIT. He studies the fundamentals of light-matter interactions with novel nanophotonics and emerging materials, developing new concepts for light sources in spectral ranges inaccessible by existing technology. Chief among these spectral ranges are the terahertz, extreme-ultraviolet, and x-ray, where new light sources can unlock possibilities for biomedical and medical imaging, for industrial quality control, and for advances in fundamental sciences. In his research, Dr. Kaminer applies elegant mathematical and algorithmic tools to solve major problems in science and technology and attempts to tackle open questions in physics and mathematics. He applies state-of-the-art experimental techniques to probe exciting phenomena in new materials with ultrafast electrons and photons. Dr. Kaminer hopes to make significant contributions to the fundamentals of electrodynamics and quantum physics, and to apply them in developing future technologies.  (read more)
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Dr. Yonatan Moss

Dr. Yonatan Moss

Dr. Moss is a newly hired senior lecturer at the Hebrew University’s Department of Comparative Religion. He obtained his PhD in religious studies at Yale, focusing on the history of ancient Christianity, and subsequently held a postdoctoral position at the Martin Buber Society of Fellows in the Humanities and Social Sciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Dr. Moss currently works on a range of issues in Judaism, Christianity and Islam in the first millennium, with a focus on the intersections between theology and politics. His current project brings a wealth of unpublished Syriac (Christian Aramaic) works by ninth-century Iraqi bishops to bear on the redesign of the contemporary Judeo-Arabic culture. Dr. Moss explores how Jewish intellectuals such as Egyptian-Iraqi luminary Saadia Gaon drew on Christian sources in their reshaping of Judaism in light of Hellenistic categories.     (read more)
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Dr. Meital Oren-Suissa

Dr. Meital Oren-Suissa

Dr. Meital Oren-Suissa is a new faculty member at the Weizmann Institute of Science in the Department of Neurobiology, having returned from a postdoctoral position at Columbia University. She studies how sexually dimorphic patterns (differences between the sexes of the same species) emerge, from synapse formation to animal behavior. Dr. Oren-Suissa’s lab uniquely addresses these questions by using the powerful genetic toolbox of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an in vivo model system. Her research group uses cutting-edge techniques in synapse labeling, neuronal imaging, high-resolution live-imaging microscopy, optogenetics and behavior analysis. The potential clinical implications for research on the influence of sex in the nervous system are immense, as many of the genes associated with common neurological diseases display sexual dimorphism in disease development, pathological processes and recovery mechanisms.   (read more)
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Dr. Graham de Ruiter

Dr. Graham de Ruiter

Dr. Graham de Ruiter completed his M.Sc studies at Leiden University. In 2008, he moved to the Weizmann Institute Science to pursue his PhD studies on sequence- dependent assembly strategies and molecular logic. Subsequently, he completed postdoctoral studies at Caltech, working on the synthesis of multi-metallic complexes for small molecule activation and oxygen atom transfer reactions. Upon returning to Israel in 2017, he was appointed to a faculty position at the Technion's Faculty of Chemistry. His research focuses on using inorganic materials to address fundamental challenges related to solar energy conversion and small-molecule activation in order to provide clean and cost-effective methods for maintaining a sustainable energy landscape.  (read more)
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Dr. Shlomi Reuveni

Dr. Shlomi Reuveni

Dr. Shlomi Reuveni is a new faculty member at the School of Chemistry at Tel Aviv University. With PhDs from both the School of Chemistry and the School of Mathematical Sciences at TAU,  he then completed postdoctoral research at Harvard's Department of Systems Biology. Dr. Reuveni is broadly interested in complex systems and has specialized in the study of systems governed by random events and statistical laws. His group conducts basic theoretical research that crosses conventional disciplinary boundaries between physics, chemistry, biology, probability and statistics; to mathematically describe, explain, and predict natural phenomena and study systems in various fields of physical chemistry and statistical and biological physics. This interdisciplinary approach has already proven useful in unravelling and explaining key features of proteins and ribosomes based on mathematical and physical principles. Demonstrating that similar principles are applicable to all living systems is a longstanding aim of Dr. Reuveni and his research group.   (read more)
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​Dr. Anat Perry

​Dr. Anat Perry

Dr. Anat Perry is a new faculty member at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in the Department of Psychology, returning to Israel from a postdoctoral position at Berkeley. She studies social phenomena in terms of interactions between their social, cognitive, and neural aspects. Her research involves applying behavioral, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and neuroimaging research techniques to both healthy and clinical populations. Three pressing questions motivate Dr. Perry’s research: What are the behavioral and brain mechanisms that underlie social psychological phenomena? To what extent do the social and non-social cognitive processes involved in these phenomena overlap? How can understanding these processes help treat deficits in social cognition such as autism or psychopathy? A better understanding of the behavioral and neural mechanisms enabling empathy and the accurate recognition of the affective states of others will contribute to creating better interventions for understanding others, for accepting others in the community and for improved adjustments to social change.  (read more)
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